Bear alum joins Badgers Hall of Fame

Maggie Meyer celebrated after winning a race in 2011, the year she was an NCAA champion.

White Bear Lake graduate Maggie (Meyer) Fergusson was recently named to the University of Wisconsin Athletic Hall of Fame for her achievements in swimming. 

Meyer is the most decorated swimmer in Badger history. She was Wisconsin’s first NCAA champion in 2011, winning the 200 backstroke in 1:50.74. She was named the Big Ten Conference Swimmer of the Year. 

Meyer was a 10-time Big Ten champion and 11-time All-American, and left Wisconsin with six school records. She also was part of 200 freestyle and 200 medley relays that set Big Ten records. She was a member of the U.S. national team in 2009 and 2010.

 

Meyer married Johno Fergusson, a swimming coach from South Africa, in 2015. They live in Illinois. At White Bear Lake, Meyer was a three-time state champion, twice in backstroke and once in 100 freestyle.

About Meyer’s NCAA championship swim, Carrie Hickman, an assistant coach at that time, told UWBadgers.com: “That night, she was just filled with confidence. She just went out and executed her race. She was spot on where all of us thought she would be. She swam the perfect race.”

That article described Meyer as a lanky 5-foot-10 athlete upon arrival at Wisconsin, never before exposed to weight or resistance training. During her time there grew to 6-foot-2 and became a workout devotee and “very analytical about her strokes, her training, her races," Hickman said.

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