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  • May 30, 2015

Pound of prevention, an ounce of cure - Your local online newspaper: News

May 30, 2015, 1:15am

Pound of prevention, an ounce of cure

Early identification key to Lyme disease treatment

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Posted: Wednesday, May 1, 2013 9:00 am | Updated: 11:06 am, Thu May 30, 2013.

As tick season and the threat of Lyme disease approaches, prevention is once again on the minds of many.

And that’s all well and good. Except one Lyme expert thinks the public is growing complacent to the message.

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Welcome to the discussion.

9 comments:

  • BerlyMama posted at 9:21 pm on Wed, May 8, 2013.

    BerlyMama Posts: 1

    Thank you for helping to educate the public about the many issues surrounding this illness. It is important for so many reasons, the most obvious being that we live in an endemic area!

    Thank you also for sharing information about the upcoming LDA conference and the cancelled AAFP course. I find it shocking and disappointing to hear that the VP of the Fairview group has done what he can to deny his practitioners the practical scientific evidence based knowledge they could have gained prior to the most dangerous time of the year for their patients. While I understand that a member of the MDH was already there, it is well known that Lyme is a controversial issue. Dr. Maloney's courses do not propose specific treatment recommendations, but simply put forth scientific evidence.

    Physicians are intelligent enough to make informed decisions about best patient care with their own critical thinking abilities. Denying the open access of scientific information, especially on controversial topics, does no one any favors. If I was a Fairview physician I would feel insulted. As a patient, I feel that I am being denied my basic right to informed consent!

    I do hope that many local physicians will take it upon themselves to take the time to investigate all schools of thought related to the diagnosis and treatment of Lyme and other Tick-Born diseases so they are best equipped to help the many affected by these diseases in our area!

     
  • Phyllis Mervine posted at 2:36 pm on Wed, May 8, 2013.

    Phyllis Mervine Posts: 1

    Thanks for your coverage of this important topic. I hope MN doctors will flock to the LDA conference at UMN on June 1-2.
    Dr. Maloney's math is conservative. Local MN health departments reported over 2,000 confirmed and probable cases to the CDC in 2011. CDC agrees that doctors report only a fraction of cases meeting their strict surveillance case definition (never intended for diagnosis). A Georgia physician found the state counted only one in 40 cases doctors diagnosed, while the CDC accepted none of these. If the same scenario is happening in MN, 40X2000=80,000 true cases or perhaps more. That figure does not include people who are never tested at all, but whose doctors diagnose them with another disease like fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue, or rheumatoid arthritis. And since as many as half the people with Lyme disease remain sick after short term treatment, this population of chronically ill and disabled people constitutes a tremendous economic burden on state taxpayers, not to mention a humanitarian crisis.

     
  • jthietje posted at 10:46 pm on Mon, May 6, 2013.

    jthietje Posts: 1

    In the past 8 weeks there were 3 desperate stories that doctors need to remember when considering further education on the treatment and diagnosis of Tick born disease.
    The first, The Winter Carnival winner who will spend her winnings on Lyme Disease Treatment, next the Star Tribune’s profiled world class musician whose Lyme diagnosis was 9 years too late and finally the Internationally recognized hairstylist who has lost her career due to undiagnosed Lyme disease. What are doctors missing? Education?
    Perhaps theses stories should give cause for pause and physicians should consider the rest of the story or the real story……..Why are patients going undiagnosed?…….Could it be that the present guidelines physicians are following could be obsolete?; allowing innocent patients to go undiagnosed? Let’s spring into action and learn from theses tragic stories and ask physicians to consider all science based information on Lyme disease to give patients a choice of treatment and a chance to live a normal life.
    Journalists, stories about the suffering from Lyme disease are emotional and attention getting; but this is all short lived. Unless we educate the public continually about prevention and hold health systems accountable to treat according to current information, not 2006 guidelines, then, as Paul Harvey would say, you are not covering the “Rest of the Story” . Good Day!

     
  • tumbleweed posted at 6:55 pm on Mon, May 6, 2013.

    tumbleweed Posts: 1

    Dr. Maloney has an excellent logical mind and is very skilled in analyzing what a study is telling us and if the study was carried out the correct way. I've heard her speak and she presents FACTS about the topic. It's pathetic that the CDC, IDSA and MN dept of health don't hear the people in our state who are asking for them to rethink what they are doing and learn why we are leaving the state to be treated. I don't think MN does any tick surveilance and testing for disease that I could find, please correct me if I'm wrong. So all the rule makers, the"deciders" have no clue of what is happening in their own state, it appears. Physicians should be presented with all the evidence available about a topic, and then they should decide with the patient, which path to follow. It appears we not only have managed care in MN but we also have managed thinking, and I certainly hope this is not the case. MN has one of the highest rates of Lyme in the US and we need to know all the facts, not just what we're told we should know and think if we live in MN.

     
  • I've been ticked posted at 9:00 am on Mon, May 6, 2013.

    I've been ticked Posts: 1

    This article seems to point out the heart of the issue. The course that Dr Maloney planned to teach and is teaching elsewhere, when allowed, gives treating physicians on the front line, information on treatment options and allows them to think in the critical manner they are trained in. Without discussion and input from others, our medical society would be in the dark ages. Isn't the issue of the difficulting in diagnosing and treating a very common illness in MN important to our medical practicioners? Or is the insurance industry still running the show??

    Whether or not doctors in MN are aware, there is a "POLITICAL" debate about the complexities of not just Lyme Disease, but also the various viruses that ticks carry that are even harder to identify in patients and to treat. What can be the harm in keeping physicians informed??

     
  • Shannon Devine posted at 7:08 pm on Sun, May 5, 2013.

    Shan Devine Posts: 2

    Also, since Dr. Maloney does not make specific recommendations and simply teaches the science of Lyme, I do not see why the class is controversial. Science is science, and the facts are the facts.

    I think the reasons behind why the class was cancelled could be called controversial more than what would be taught in the class.

     
  • Shannon Devine posted at 6:55 pm on Sun, May 5, 2013.

    Shan Devine Posts: 2

    Information is power. I'm not sure why the VP would want to limit knowledge about such a very important subject, but I think it is a bad decision. We should be pushing MN to be ahead of the pack, leading the way in fighting this terrible disease. When there is better testing and everyone sees the amount of Lyme that is MN, people are going to look back and see who dropped the ball (or tried to hide it).

    I am glad we have people like Dr. Maloney working tirelessly to help all in MN. It is too bad not everyone recognizes what a treasure she is.

     
  • Minnesota Lyme posted at 10:26 am on Fri, May 3, 2013.

    Minnesota Lyme Posts: 1

    The Lyme Disease Association,Inc. announces its 14th annual scientific conference, Lyme & Other Tick-Borne Diseases: Science, Research & Myth. The Conference will be held at the University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN, on Saturday June 1 and Sunday June 2, 2013. 11.0 Prescribed CME Credits are available for Physicians.*

    This course sticks strictly to the scientific evidence.

     
  • Pete posted at 8:05 am on Fri, May 3, 2013.

    Pete Posts: 1

    As a high school educator myself I think it is great that intellectual opportunities like this exist for Physicians to learn the latest in scientific research AND get Continuing Education Credits. Can only imagine the collegial dialogue and benefit this course will be to Minnesotan physicians as this is a cutting edge topic and HUGE issue in this state. Glad this presenter is using scientific evidence in the course and not representing a certain company or specific treatment plan. With the high number of ticks in this state I hope many docs get this education!!

     

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